Which one is to be feared more: Racism or AIDS?

Which one is to be feared more: Racism or AIDS?[1]

Becoming HIV positive is always the result of unfortunate circumstances. In fact, often the person is a victim of poverty, polygamy, abuse, or simply being born from an HIV positive mother, who herself was a victim of the social and global order.

The racist could be a victim too, but only of his/her own willful stupidity.

 

Being HIV positive does not inherently indicate anything about the person’s intelligence.

Being racist almost always indicates that the person is close-minded and intellectually lacking.

 

HIV positive people present no danger to anyone under the normal conditions of social and political interaction in the public sphere.

The mere presence of racists in the public sphere, mass media, centers of the culture industry, and educational institutions represents a serious threat to social values, the public well-being, and security.

 

HIV victims have never caused a war. They do not band together in political associations aimed at spreading the virus of which they are victims.

Racists have caused the most devastating wars and acts of violence in human history from the beginning of colonialism to this date. They actively engage in political movements and organizations to impose and sustain social inequality and injustice both locally and globally.

 

Victims of HIV are implicitly condemned by religious institutions even though those same religious institutions played a major role in the spread of the disease due to their opposition to protected sex.

Racism is often blessed if not inspired by powerful religious institutions the world over.

 

So, I ask, which one is to be feared more?


[1] In reference to the controversy surrounding Justine Sacco, which was sparked by her now infamous racist tweet: “going to Africa. Hope I don’t get AIDS. Just kidding. I’m white!”

Advertisements

About Saladdin Ahmed

Saladdin Ahmed is a post-nihilist philosopher who has declared full independence.
This entry was posted in Reflections and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s